neanderthal

A human skull, left, and a Neandertal skull, right. Ephert via Wikimedia Commons

How often do we read this headline “New Discover Sheds New Light on Evolution”, only to find out that the discovery doesn’t confirm, but corrupts evolutionary models? I wrote in a previous post that macroevolutionary science is like playing Whack-A-Mole. Nothing ever seems to get solved, just changed.whacamole

Well, it happened again recently with human evolution. In the Journal “Nature” some scientists have published a paper detailing their discovery of evidence that Neanderthals and Denisovans, (subspecies of modern humans) interbred and produced offspring.¹

But wait a minute, Neanderthals are said to be evidence of the evolution of humans and claimed to be a separate species. I thought species were not able to mate with each other?

EVOLUTION 101: Speciation; UC Berkeley

The key to speciation is the evolution of genetic differences between the incipient species. For a lineage to split once and for all, the two incipient species must have genetic differences that are expressed in some way that causes matings between them to either not happen or to be unsuccessful.

Evolution science has a long history of solving apparent falsifications of the theory with new models. The term used to get around the interbreeding problem is called hybridization.


Hybridization

This is a term of convenience, (just as is the term species is) for a theory to keep macroevolution from being falsified.

If you have read some of my other posts on logical reasoning you will recognize the circular reasoning.

  • Premise 1. New species are evidence of the creative power of evolution
  • Premise 2. Species are subjectively defined by evolutionists
  • Therefore because speciation occurs, evolution is a fact

Understanding EVOLUTION; UC Berkeley

…many plants, and some animals, form hybrids in nature. 

…There are lots of other places where the boundary of a species is blurred. It’s not so surprising that these blurry places exist — after all, the idea of a species is something that we humans invented for our own convenience!


Punctuated Equilibrium

Here is another theory that solves contradictory evidence and falsification of common ancestry, it was needed to explain why the fossil record lacks the transitional evidence predicted by Darwin. It is called “Punctuated Equilibrium“. This is a fancy term to explain why the fossil record shows sudden appearances of living things followed by no change (Stasis) at all.

The common thread here is that too often evolution works this way, until it doesn’t, then it works another way. Evolution is the foundation by which all the evidence is interpreted and explained, instead of the other way around. The tale is waging the dog.

Is it really a wonder why evolutionary scientists get so angry and vitriolic when questioned about contradictions and false premises?

Often when blatant contradictions are pointed out, One is not met with cogent and logical reasoning, but with character or credential assassination followed up by the last resort, “you just don’t understand how evolution works”.

Interestingly on the UC Berkeley’s website page on punctuated equilibrium, the first sentences are about misunderstanding the model, and that it doesn’t mean evolution is wrong. Sounds a tad defensive yes?

Dr. James Tour is a synthetic chemist who builds molecules from atoms for a living, he says that “NO ONE” understands macroevolution because he as asked top chemists and evolutionary scientists to explain it to him, but no one can.

Could all this unpleasantness be rooted in frustration?

When you are ridiculed for your beliefs, its not because they are baseless, it is because it is easier for someone to insult your intelligence rather than try and defend something they believe that can not be explained.


If you have any comments please feel free to share them below and hit the “LIKE” button if you did.

Robert J.


References

  1. “The genome of the offspring of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father”; Nature.com, Viviane Slon et al.